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Université Côte d'Azur, the CNRS and the Côte d'Azur Observatory sign a commitment to keep all public communication free from gender stereotypes

Gender equality was emphasized on February 26, 2019 when the commitment was signed to keep all public communication free from gender stereotypes. Université Côte d'Azur, the Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and the Côte d'Azur Observatory undertake, alongside the High Council for Gender Equality, to respect this fundamental principle in communication.


Publication : 11/03/2019
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After a lecture entitled “No, the masculine does not prevail over the feminine,” delivered by Eliane Viennot, Professor Emeritus of French Renaissance Literature, the signatories of the commitment for public communication without gender stereotypes gathered on the stage of the IAE amphitheater. In the presence of Marion Oderda, from the High Council for Gender Equality, Jean-Marc Gambaudo, President of the Université Côte d'Azur, Marc Dalloz, Vice-President of the Board of Directors of the Université Nice Sophia Antipolis, representing the President Emmanuel Tric, Alain Schuhl, CNRS Deputy General Director for Science and Thierry Lanz, Director of the Côte d'Azur Observatory, pledged to promote policies that encourage gender-sensitive communication and foster a culture of equality. 

The five signatories of the commitment agreed to: 

Recognize the importance of preventing and reducing gender stereotypes in public communication.
Adopt the practical guide (http://www.haut-conseil-egalite.gouv.fr/img/pdf/guide_pour_un_communicati on_publique_sans_stereotype_de_sexe_vf_2016_11_02.compressed.pdf ) and its 10 recommendations, and circulate it among all staff.
Share the guide with contractors and external partners who prepare communication material on behalf of the institution. 

Marion Oderda repeated that the missions of the High Council for Gender Equality are “to offer recommendations to the government and elected officials, monitor public policies, and foster public debate with respect to the main orientations given to gender equality policies”. This independent consultative body issued a report, the first inventory of sexism in France, which was published on January 17, 2019. 

The representative of the High Council was delighted and did not hide her enthusiasm: “It is a real pleasure for the High Council for Gender Equality to be present as you officially sign this commitment.”

"On behalf of the University, let's get to work!" announced Marc Dalloz. 

According to Marc Dalloz, Vice-President of the UNS Executive Board, gender equality is “self-evident”. He sees the University as “the first place where this issue needs to be addressed”.

Thierry Lanz, Director of the Côte d'Azur Observatory also spoke about the the role played by his institution in this commitment: “The Côte d'Azur Observatory has decided to clearly give priority to gender equality.” He went on to stress the importance of nurturing diversity and inclusive attitudes “which must be reflected in the language we use and how we communicate”. 

Alain Schuhl, CNRS Deputy General Director for Science, talked about the objectives of the research center: “Our responsibility at the CNRS is to offer women the same career opportunities as those offered to men.” “The commitment we are signing today is only one aspect of an overall policy,” the Deputy General Director added. 

“A lot of work remains to be done,” explained Jean-Marc Gambaudo. 

Jean-Marc Gambaudo, President of the Université Côte d'Azur, pointed out that “gender equality cannot be taken for granted, not in our University, in any case,” but it is now urgent to reach this goal, said the President of the Université Côte d'Azur. Gender equality is one of the core values of the Université Côte d'Azur, “I believe that a lot has already been accomplished: we have created an equality network with all the members of the Université Côte d’Azur, a special unit to monitor, listen and bring support to women who are the victim of violence, and a mentoring program for female doctoral students. These are just the first steps. A lot of work remains to be done to achieve equal opportunity and increase the share of women in leadership positions,” he concluded.