Sylvain Antoniotti - Institut de Chimie de Nice UMR 7272 CNRS - UNS - Keywords: catalysis, sustainability, organic synthesis

Sylvain Antoniotti - Institut de Chimie de Nice UMR 7272 CNRS - UNS - Keywords: catalysis, sustainability, organic synthesis

Contribution title: Complex molecules synthesis made easy

The chemical synthesis or organic molecules typically requires long sequence of individual chemical reactions with an incremental increase in complexity at each step. Environmental concerns in regards of waste generation and resource and energy consumption in the practice of chemistry have motivated chemists to reconsider many aspects of their activity and to formulate new paradigms contributing to the transversal field of sustainable chemistry. An important principle of sustainable chemistry is the use of catalysis, a phenomenon of chemical reactivity by which a small amount of substance is increasing reaction rates without formally taking part in the chemical mechanism. By the finely tuned design of molecular catalysts, highly efficient and selective reactions have been discovered and used in chemical synthesis resulting in the reduction of the number of individual steps required to achieve a given synthesis of complex molecules.
In this presentation, we will detail our results in the design of multicatalytic reactions, and show how we manage to integrate multiple catalytic reactions working simultaneously and synergistically to deliver in one single operation complex molecules from simple starting material.
For example, we have combined nanocatalysis, e.g. the catalysis of chemical reactions by metal nanoparticles, to cleanly and selectively use O2 from air to perform oxidation reaction with base catalysis to generate in one operation chromene and 1,2-dihydroquinoline derivatives featuring up to 5 individual reactions. In another example, Lewis acid catalysis was involved to assemble chemical entities in a biomimetic synthesis of THC analogues. These molecules are the core structure of many naturally occurring bioactive complex molecules.
Finally, these reactions have been transferred to continuous flow chemical reactors using millifluidic technology for more efficient, cleaner, and safer chemical synthesis.