Doctorant

Roxane Bartoletti

Roxane Bartoletti Ph.D student - Psychology
Roxane Bartoletti Ph.D student - Psychology
Doctorante en Psychologie cognitive et expérimentale

Coordonnées

Discipline(s)

Lettres et sciences humaines > Psychologie, psychologie clinique, psychologie sociale, Sciences > Neurosciences

Discipline(s) enseignée(s)

Teaching activities:

Multisensory approaches ; Non-pharmacological approaches ; Elderly psychopathology ; Clinical Method ; Ethics in Research ; Statistics ; Interviews & observations.

Thèmes de recherche

Roxane L. Bartoletti is a Ph.D student in Psychology.

"The future is unwritten, so we now have the chance to write and shape the future of multisensory experiences."

- Marianna Obrist and Carlos Velasco in Multisensory Experiences, Where the Senses Meet Technology


She studies the influences of multisensory environments on human cognition. She explores the effects of customized and imposed multisensory environments on the executive functions' performances of young and older adults.

As Marianna Obrist and Carlos Velasco wrote about themselves in their book Multisensory Experiences, Where the Senses Meet Technology, Roxane L. Bartoletti is "fascinated by the power of the senses and the opportunities to shape the impressions that humans develop of the world around us". She thinks that a better understanding of how multisensory environments influence cognition should enable the development of concrete and relevant applications in health fields. According to her, it should be possible to adapt workplaces, schools, hospital living spaces, and senior residences for better cognitive performances and well-being of the users.

Research interests:

Her research interests allowed her to work on different subjects. During the first year of her master’s degree (2017-2018), she studied the effects of cognitive training, with and without musical instruments on executive functions of Alzheimer patients. Her participation in the Summer School of Alzheimer Innovation at Côte d’Azur University (Nice, France) allowed her to develop skills in research communication among international coworkers.
During her second master’s degree (2018-2019), she investigated multisensory integration in the context of the body schema. She adapted the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) paradigm in designing an experimental protocol to investigate the importance of the congruency of multisensory signals on the fingers.
She is currently a PhD student and her research topic focuses on the study of multisensory environmental influences on the cognitive performance of young (18 to 35 years old) and older adults (48 to 65 years old). More precisely, her work aims to study the impact of personalized olfactory-auditive environments on executive functioning performances.

Informations complémentaires

Grants:

In October 2019, she obtained a contract from the French Ministry of Research and Higher Education to carry out a PhD. This doctoral funding has been supplemented by 7000€ obtained in the Scientific Incentive Credits internal grant program of the Côte d'Azur University (principal investigator: Xavier Corveleyn). This funding allowed the acquisition of a computer, scents, and compensation for participants. A second grant of 2665€ was obtained from the Graduate School of Health Sciences Ecosystems at Côte d’Azur University (principal investigator: Roxane Bartoletti). This funding was used to purchase a Biopac module for the acquisition of physiological data (electro-dermal activity and respiratory rate).

Popular science:

"Quelle musique choisir pour faire du sport ou travailler ?" - Article in The Conversation https://theconversation.com/quelle-musique-choisir-pour-faire-du-sport-ou-travailler-163783
"Écouter de la musique ou diffuser des odorants pour travailler : peut-on augmenter notre concentration en modifiant notre environnement sensoriel ?" - Podcast and article in Milgram de Savoirs https://milgram.ulb.be/100g/episodes-100g/ecouter-de-la-musique-ou-diffuser-des-odorants-pour-travailler-peut-on-augmenter-notre-concentration-en-modifiant-notre-environnement-sensoriel/